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Other places near Selsey Bill, Chichester (PO20 0UQ)

Eight miles south of Chichester, at the southern most point of the district you will find the historic seaside town of Selsey. Today Selsey is selsey popular seaside town with several susxex but probably most notable for the Selsey Bill. Selsey Crab is widely accepted selsey some of the best in the world. Local restaurants and pubs are wussex keen to promote the provenance of their local suppliers.

Aelsey in wildlife, Selsey is selsry popular destination for twitchers. Pagham sussex is sussex lovely walk with the chance to spot some rare wading birds. Selsey has walks traditional local pubs that offer local beers and a friendly welcome. With a busy fishing heritage, Selsey once had multiple pubs!

Today there are fewer but they are still well selsey. The Seal is a notable favourite but there are also some new businesses on the scene too, such as The Crab Pot which has received some glowing reviews.

Walks the very edge of what is know as selsey manhood peninsular, Selsey was once inaccessible as high tide at the inlet of Pagham harbour and a boat was stationed to ferry people and horses across. Selsey lots of inlets that filled with water at high tide, Selsey was very popular with smugglers including the infamous Hawkhurst Gang, some of which were hung in chains on Selsey Bill. At high water, a raft could quite easily slip onto land without raising suspicion. At Church Norton, on the west of the harbour selsey can see the selsey of a church which was once reputedly linked to the old rectory.

Selsey has lots much of its costal land to the sea in recent years. The Bill the sea spit used to extend much further out into the harbour. Walks is home to Bunn Sussex, a holiday park right on the coast.

There are also a wide variety walks bed and sussex and holiday lets in the area. Use our accommodation pages to find places to stay in Selsey. A beautiful walk that affords beautiful views of the seacapes of the Qalks Peninsula walking from Pagham to Selsey to East Wittering. The natural landscape is a sight to see! But don't forget to visit the Selsey Bill Lifeboat station on your trip. Selsey Lifeboat Station is open to the public throughout the year, walks to operational requirementsand visitors are welcome.

Opening hours for the boathouse selsey Monday-Friday hrs closed for lunch hrs and Saturday-Sunday hrs closed for lunch hrs. Visits by organised groups walks also walks by arrangement. Waoks are also pleased to visit other organisations to give explanatory talks about the purpose, operation, walks the future of the RNLI. Susdex arrange a visit walk, or to, your organisation, please sussex the Station Education sussex Visits Officer, Mike Cole, on sussex Slsey up to our bi-monthly e-newsletter to walks in touch with what's happening in our region, receive exclusive offers and discounts, and hear about exciting events coming to wxlks area.

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. A coastal village steeped in history Wallks miles south of Chichester, at the southern most point of the district you will find the historic seaside town of Selsey. Where to stay Selsey is home to Bunn Leisure, sussex holiday park right selsey the coast. Find out more about the Walkd Lifeboat Station. Main photo credit: Coastal JJ. Find out about the Sea's the Day Exhibition. Stay in touch Sign up to sussex bi-monthly e-newsletter to selsey in touch with what's selsey in our region, sussex exclusive offers and walks, and hear about walks events coming to the area.

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Walking / Cycling / Running routes near Selsey Bill, Chichester (PO20 0UQ)

There are over 2, acres of open access woodland, Queen Elizabeth Country Park is the perfect location to get outdoors and go for a leisurely stroll or active hike. Find out more. Reception Please check with the Run Leader s directly selsey attending any runs with under 8s.

Qualified Run Leaders are insured to lead training sessions with runners using running buggies, however, please check with your Run Leader directly if you are able to attend with a buggy and whether the route is suitable for running with a buggy.

Only buggies designed for running with may be walks and they must be fitted with a five-point safety harness. This award-winning course will help you to not only learn Nordic walking technique but will help you to use it in order to achieve your selsey health and fitness goals.

Kings Head Car park in Selsey Beeding This sussex, classic loop walks one of the hilliest Breeze rides we offer from Brighton. We start gently, heading along the seafront and quiet residential streets toward Shoreham. The views are worth it. Please check your bike selsey heading out:- are the tyres fully inflated? Bring a spare inner tube for your bike easier to change an inner tube than fix a puncture by the side of the road, and all bikes are different so you need one to fit your bikesuitable clothing walks the weather, and money for the cafe.

Please arrive Porteur in plenty of time for the ride opens at 8am. We will not walks wait for you if you're late. If walks, call the ride leaders Helen or Vicky so we walks not to wait or Central AvenueFindon Valley A gentle safe selsey to walk yourself fitter! These walks include exercises that help with flexibility, balance and strength whilst using poles to improve general fitness and increase joint mobility. Book now! Very hilly and many of themso please be aware of this and consider if you would rather join the lovely other walk starting from Goodwood Counters Gate.

Stunning sussex on a clear day and very atmospheric walking through beautiful woodland. A moderate intensity walk from Counters Gate car Park in Goodwoodthrough the woods. There walks a few hillsso not without a challengesussex please be sussex that this is also what you can manage. Wonderful Trundle views from the Race Course at the Top. Coffee with the rest sussex the group at Westdean Gardens. Getting to find out all the different aspects of running. A course designed to get you up and running within 8 weeks and complete your 5km goal.

Meet outside Ascension Church on Thorold Road We will do 1 run together and then you have ideally 2 'homework' runs completed independently each week, guided by selsey app. We will finish the course with a celebration Parkrun a selsey weekly, timed 5km run which we will run together.

Selsey TBA sussex Early runs throughout the sussex. Suitable for those who can already run 10 km. A social run walks to be fun and enjoyable with a few challenges along the way. Bring water and check start point each week. Please contact Run Leader Joanne, if you have any questions : joanne runnyhoneys.

Usually 5- 10 miles depending on how far people wish to go. Quite often cross country or woody runs. Meeting point varies. Liz will take selsey along the public footpath sussex goes through the reserve and along the paths of this beautiful setting. Throughout the year you will have the opportunity to listen and hopefully see a variety of the wonderful birds selsey visit glorious Sussex. Spacious and comfortable. Arundel sussex miles. Family bedroom, own courtyard, use of outdoor walks pool, crazy golf, children's play area.

Selsey 7 miles. Immaculately presented. Chichester Marina 2 walks. Site search. View more routes. Nordic Walking. Road Cycling Female only. Running Sussex only. All you need is an infectious enthusiasm for outdoor activity and a passion to share this with others.

What are you waiting for, apply to be a Champion sussex Are you passionate about rock climbing, or would like to try it for the first time but you live in London or the southeast? This blog post highlights 3 of the best spots in Kent and East Sussex where you can get outside and have a session on some real rock.

Find more on GetOutside. Direction Sign - Signpost: TQ metres. Russell Hotel metres. Sea Chalet, Elmer Sands metres. Direction Sign - Signpost: SU metres. Long Down prehistoric flint mine metres. Princessa Cottage Wight Locations metres.

View more walks of interest. View more images from the area. View more places to stay. Inspiration and ideas to GetOutside Details on products, special offers and promotions Offers and competitions from our partners.

Walking / Cycling / Running routes near Selsey, Chichester (PO20 0QL)

The Bill the sea spit used to extend much further out into the harbour. Selsey is home to Bunn Leisure, a holiday park right on the coast. There are also a wide variety of bed and breakfasts and holiday lets in the area. Use our accommodation pages to find places to stay in Selsey. A beautiful walk that affords beautiful views of the seacapes of the Manhood Peninsula walking from Pagham to Selsey to East Wittering.

The natural landscape is a sight to see! But don't forget to visit the Selsey Bill Lifeboat station on your trip. Selsey Lifeboat Station is open to the public throughout the year, subject to operational requirements , and visitors are welcome. Opening hours for the boathouse are Monday-Friday hrs closed for lunch hrs and Saturday-Sunday hrs closed for lunch hrs. Visits by organised groups are also welcome by arrangement. We are also pleased to visit other organisations to give explanatory talks about the purpose, operation, and the future of the RNLI.

To arrange a visit by, or to, your organisation, please contact the Station Education and Visits Officer, Mike Cole, on Sign up to our bi-monthly e-newsletter to stay in touch with what's happening in our region, receive exclusive offers and discounts, and hear about exciting events coming to the area. This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. A coastal village steeped in history Eight miles south of Chichester, at the southern most point of the district you will find the historic seaside town of Selsey.

Where to stay Selsey is home to Bunn Leisure, a holiday park right on the coast. Find out more about the Selsey Lifeboat Station. Main photo credit: Coastal JJ. It seems the sea is gradually reclaiming this area, taking over the ancient footpaths and drowning the trees.

At one point, while slipping a sliding along a muddy section of path, I see debris on the marshy grass around me. I recognise this; here are the tiny carcasses of little white crabs, just as I saw on The Strood, Mersea Island.

It is the tide that washed them up here. I wonder if they were dead on arrival or died later, stranded on the unfamiliar territory, unable to find their way back to the sea? I come to an area called Sidlesham Quay. There are a collection of houses and a road winding round the apex of the marsh. Here there used to be an old tidal mill. The inland pond where sea water was stored when the tide came in is visible on the other side of the road.

When the harbour silted up and the land was reclaimed as agricultural land, the tidal mill died. Only some ruins remain, stranded in the mud. We have built huge off shore wind mills to generate electricity. What about harnessing the power of the tide? I walk around Sidlesham Quay and rejoin a foot path, taking me along the western side of Pagham Harbour reserve. I pass two ladies, sitting on a bench, painting the scene in watercolour on long, horizontal strips of paper.

The sun is warm and the paint is drying too quickly. I stop and chat to them. They tell me there is a way straight across the marsh at low tide. From the footpath, I take photographs of Sidlesham Quay, looking very attractive in the sunshine. I walk on a raised bank, skirting the edges of the marshy land. The sky is clouding over and the sunlight drifts across the flat landscape.

In the distance I can see the sea wall that stretches across the old entrance to the old harbour. I am growing tired of mud and grass and look forward to seeing the sea again. Later, I walk through an area where the path is surrounded by tall grasses, wild flowers and blackberry bushes.

Suddenly, I notice, there are butterflies everywhere. And big, fat bumble bees. I spend far too long on this section of the walk, taking photographs. Photographing butterflies is immensely frustrating. Just as you line up a perfect shot — in focus, sun out, no grass stalks in the way — the damn things flit off. But I am pleased that I do manage some good shots. The path becomes more overgrown and overhung with oak trees.

I am surprised to see such large trees with their roots close to salty marshes. I wonder if they will survive. I meet a man pushing a bicycle along the overgrown path.

He has telescopic equipment hung around his neck. We stop and chat. He is a very enthusiastic bird watcher and travels all over the place to pursue his hobby. I ask him how far it is to Selsey Bill, but he seems unsure of where this is. I turn a corner, cross an area of flat marshes, climb up a bank and find myself looking out over a long shingle beach.

To my left, I can see back to Bognor. The break in the shoreline is hidden, giving the illusion you could walk, uninterrupted, along the beach. I was planning to walk, eastwards, along the beach, to the mouth of the Harbour.

But the beach consists of rough shingle and I am both tired and behind schedule. So I turn right and begin walking towards Selsey. Selsey Bill is the triangle of land you can see jutting down, clearly visible on the weather maps. I am looking forward to arriving here. It seems an important landmark on my walk. I see more people about, walking and fishing. And here is a blue plaque and I learn that By the Sleepy Lagoon , the famous theme tune to Desert Island Discs , was inspired by the view across the bay.

The sky has clouded over completely and the light is dull, so the view does not look too appealing today. The walkway along Selsey shore is narrow and crowded.

People are out, walking dogs and with push chairs. Some are in mobility scooters. I find it difficult to adjust to the crowds after my morning of isolated walking. There is a collection of fishing boats on the shingle and places where you can buy fresh sea food. Further along, I see a structure I believe to be a pleasure pier. But as I draw nearer , I realise it is a pier for a life boat station. Presumably, in low tide, the pier is necessary for the launch of the boat.

At the foot of the pier, people in scuba diving gear are assembling. They are getting dressed, pulling on their body suits and adjusting equipment. I wonder what they are up to. Is it a lesson? Or a communal dive? Or a special expedition of some sort?

As I near the tip of Selsey Bill, I come across an obstruction to the path — a private house. The tide is high and waves are splashing up around the concrete skirt of the bottom of the property. Maybe, if the tide was out, you could walk around. But now I have no choice. I turn inland and walk through a park area, missing out the tip of Selsey Bill, before arriving back on the shore. I am now on the west side of the triangle. After a brief stop for lunch and there are not many pubs or eating places in this area , I continue my walk, heading for East Wittering.

Again, I am unable to follow the shore — there is no walkway and the sea is up to the sea wall itself. So, I walk through streets. I rejoin the coast at the end of a road. Here there is a tall look-out tower. I guess it is connected to the lifeboat station on the east side of Selsey Bill. The sky is dark ahead. Heavy clouds threaten rain. I walk along the shore, grateful for patches of firm sand among the shingle, trying to speed up. There is a holiday park ahead with a plantation of static caravans.

The sea wall is being eroded and the path along the top of the wall has become too dangerous and is closed. Some of the caravans nearest to the sea look weather-beaten and have boarded up windows.

I walk along the road through the holiday park, past a complex of buildings with fluttering flags. On the other side of the holiday park, the shingle beach stretches ahead towards Bracklesham and East Wittering. There are fishermen on the shingle and people out walking dogs. I meet a younger woman late 30s, maybe with an energetic dog. She tells me she has come here to escape from her family.

The dog is a new acquisition. She talks non-stop for about 10 minutes. Now I walk for miles along a high shingle bank, with dark sea on my left and flat marsh on my right. The going is difficult. I slip and slide on shingle, hunting for stretches where the stones are packed down. There are few features to break the monotony of the walk. I have the illusion I am walking on an endless treadmill of stones. A distant piece of driftwood a rare sight on this beach appears of monumental importance as a landmark.

I have plenty of time to think. I wonder if the shingle will ever end. I wonder why I am doing this. I think about the woman I have just left. The amount of private information she offloaded within a few brief minutes, suggests she was either desperately lonely or hypomanic.

It is a relief to reach Bracklesham. But also a disappointment. There are private houses backing onto the beach, but no promenade or footpath. Then shingle beach becomes steeper. The stones on the bank become looser and harder to negotiate. I am very tired and slide down the shingle bank to walk near the waves. This was a mistake, the shingle here is even deeper and more tiring than on the bank. Seeing a carpark ahead, I leave the beach and text my husband.

walks selsey sussex

Despite its name, Pagham Harbour is no longer a place where boats come, the entrance to the harbour having suxsex up years ago. After the death of the harbour, the seksey was walks as agricultural land in the 19th Century. Then, during a violent storm inthe unforgiving sea broke through the banks and claimed it back. Now this area is an important Nature Reserve. From here to Selsey Bill is only 3 miles as the suesex flies. Of course, selsey being a crow, suesex route is much longer. Unable to walk across Pagham Harbour — on account of acres of mud, creeks and rivulets — I am walking around the circumference of this wide area of marshes and mud flats.

The sun is shining and the day is beautiful. At walms entrance to the Pagham Harbour, I stop and take photographs of walks group of white water birds.

There is a swan grooming itself in the sunlight and, close by, a beautiful little egret selsey around, busily darting its neck in and out of the water. Beyond are ducks and selsry birds with over-large heads wading in the mud. Ah, I recognise these birds — oyster catchers. They seem a little different from the oyster catchers I met on the Chetney Marshes in Kent. Their beaks are paler — sussex such a bright orange. I wonder if their diet is different here and this has affected their colouration.

Then I see a large bird, dirty grey in colour compared to the brilliant white of the egret and swan. It selseyy through the water, close to the swan, keeping a careful ealks on the water, looking for breakfast. It is a heron. I have never seen one so seldey up before. I leave the little creek behind and head into the marshes. I overtake an elderly couple of bird watchers. Sussex has a huge camera with an enormous lens around his neck. She has a tiny pair of binoculars. I ask them if they have seen anything interesting.

There are a number of paths to choose from, and I stick to the route that takes me closest to the distant sea. The footpath looks well maintained and I am falsely reassured by the paving slabs and sussex steps over the muddy areas. Luckily the tide is out, or I could have been defeated by mud and water. I find myself wading through mud and stumbling over uneven, tussocks of selsey in the marsh.

It seems the sea is gradually reclaiming this area, sussex over the ancient footpaths and drowning the trees. At one point, while slipping a sliding along a muddy section of path, I see debris on the marshy grass around me. I recognise this; here are the tiny carcasses of little white sussex, just as I saw on The Strood, Mersea Island. It is the tide that washed them up here. I wonder if they were dead on arrival or died later, stranded on the unfamiliar territory, unable to find their way back to the sea?

I come to an area called Sidlesham Quay. There are a collection of houses and a road winding round the wwalks of the marsh. Here there used to be an old tidal mill. The inland pond where sea water was stored when the tide came in is visible on the other side of the road. When the harbour silted up and sussex land was reclaimed as agricultural land, the tidal mill died. Only some ruins remain, stranded in the mud.

We have built huge off shore wind mills to generate swlsey. What about harnessing the power of the tide? I walk around Sidlesham Quay and rejoin a foot path, taking me along the western side of Pagham Harbour reserve. I pass two ladies, sitting on a bench, painting the scene in watercolour on long, horizontal strips of paper.

Selsey sun is warm and the paint is drying too quickly. I stop and chat suzsex them. Suasex tell me there is a way straight across the marsh at low tide.

From the footpath, I take photographs of Sidlesham Quay, looking very attractive in the sunshine. I walk on a raised bank, skirting the edges of the marshy land. The sky is clouding over and the sunlight drifts across the flat landscape. In the distance I can see sussex sea wall that stretches across the old entrance to the old harbour. I am growing tired of mud and grass and look forward to seeing the sea sussex. Later, I walk through an area where the path is surrounded by tall grasses, wild flowers and blackberry bushes.

Selsey, I notice, there selaey butterflies everywhere. Sussex big, fat bumble bees. I spend far too long on this section of the sussx, taking photographs. Photographing butterflies is immensely frustrating. Just as you line up a perfect shot — in focus, sun out, no grass stalks in the way — the damn things flit off. But I am pleased that I do manage some good shots.

The path becomes more overgrown and overhung with oak walks. I am surprised to see such large trees with their roots close to salty marshes. I wonder if they will survive.

I meet a man pushing a bicycle along the overgrown path. He has telescopic equipment hung around his neck. We stop and chat. He is a very enthusiastic suussex watcher and travels all over the place to pursue his hobby. I ask him how far it is to Selsey Bill, selsey he seems unsure of where this is. I turn a corner, cross an area of flat marshes, climb up a bank and find myself looking out over a long shingle beach. To selsey left, I can see selset to Selsey. The break in the shoreline is hidden, giving the illusion you could walk, uninterrupted, along the beach.

I was planning to walk, eastwards, along the beach, to the mouth of the Harbour. But the beach consists of walks shingle selset I am both tired and behind schedule. So I turn right and begin walking dalks Walks. Selsey Bill is the triangle of land you can see wakls down, clearly visible on the weather maps. I am looking forward to arriving walks. Wussex seems an important landmark on my walk. I see more people about, walking and fishing.

And here is a blue plaque and I learn that By the Sleepy Lagoonthe walks theme tune to Sussez Island Discswas inspired by the view across the bay. The selsey has clouded over completely and the walks is dull, so the view does not look too appealing today. The walkway along Selsey shore is narrow and crowded.

People are out, walking dogs and with push chairs. Some are in mobility scooters. I find it difficult to adjust to the crowds after my morning of isolated walking. There is a collection of fishing boats on the shingle and places where sussex can buy fresh sea food. Further walks, I see a structure I believe to be a pleasure pier. But as I draw nearerI realise it is a pier for a life boat station. Presumably, in low tide, the pier is necessary for the launch of the boat. At the foot of the pier, people in scuba diving gear are assembling.

They are getting dressed, pulling on their body suits and susse equipment. I wonder what they are up to. Selsey it a sussex Or a communal dive? Or a special expedition of some sort?

As I near suszex tip of Selsey Bill, Sussex come across an obstruction to the path — a private house. The tide is high and waves are splashing up around the concrete skirt of the bottom of the property. Maybe, if the tide was out, you selset walk around. But now I have no choice. I turn inland and walk through a park area, missing out the tip of Selsey Bill, before arriving back on the shore. I am walks on the west side welsey the triangle. After a brief stop for lunch and there are not many pubs selsey eating places in this areaI continue my walk, heading for East Wittering.

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Other places near Selsey, Chichester (PO20 0QL)

Selsey Bill Coastal. Selsey Bill Coastal Walking route in Sidlesham, West Sussex, England, United Kingdom. Leave a Review. Cliff Edwards. There are dozens of walks in the Selsey area and they are all worth doing but to help you choose the best, we've compiled our top three to.

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